In the story "Born Worker," the author conveys that Arnie identifies more with his French heritage than with his Mexican roots, attributing this to his sensitive skin. He recounts that in France, people mistook him for Portuguese or Armenian, but never for Mexican.

English · Middle School · Thu Feb 04 2021

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The key aspect of Arnie's character in the story "Born Worker" by Gary Soto is his complex relationship with his identity, particularly his ethnic and cultural heritage. Arnie's sensitive skin becomes a symbolic and literal manifestation of his discomfort with his Mexican roots and his inclination towards his French heritage. When he says that people in France mistook him for being Portuguese or Armenian rather than Mexican, it implies that his appearance and perhaps also his mannerisms do not align with the typical stereotypes or expectations associated with being Mexican. This detail about Arnie’s experiences in France reinforces the theme of identity and belonging, emphasizing the fact that Arnie feels a disconnect from his Mexican heritage and appears more aligned with his French side.

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 In the story "Born Worker" by Gary Soto, the author indeed uses the character Arnie to touch upon themes of heritage and identity. Arnie is portrayed as a character who is of Mexican descent but does not fully identify with this part of his heritage. Instead, he leans more towards his French heritage, which is highlighted in the narrative when Arnie's sensitive skin is mentioned. The sensitive skin symbolizes his inclination towards his French side, which is considered more fitting to the European climate and genetics. Arnie's experiences in France, where he was mistaken for being Portuguese or Armenian, further underline his disconnect with his Mexican roots. These mistaken identities suggest a fluid perception of his ethnic appearance while also hinting at his disassociation or possibly his desire to be distanced from his Mexican heritage.