Why did the Republican Henry Cabot Lodge refuse to ratify the League of Nations? Is it A-Lodge believed Article 10 of the covenant infringed on the United States' power to declare war, if necessary, and expand its territories.B-Lodge was offended that President Wilson had only selected one Republican to join his delegation to the Versailles Peace Conference.C-Lodge felt the League of Nations weakened the United States' global power and gave too many liberties to European nations OR D-Lodge thought President Wilson's ideas about world order, as presented in his League of Nations draft agreement, weren't realistic

English · Middle School · Thu Feb 04 2021

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A - Lodge believed Article 10 of the covenant infringed on the United States' power to declare war, if necessary, and expand its territories.

Henry Cabot Lodge was a leading Republican senator and chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee after World War I. He strongly opposed the Treaty of Versailles, which included the covenant of the League of Nations, primarily because of Article 10, which dealt with collective security. He believed Article 10 could lead to the United States being dragged into international conflicts without the consent of Congress and hence infringe upon U.S. sovereignty, particularly its power to make decisions about war. Lodge and other like-minded senators were concerned that joining the League would limit America's freedom to act independently in international affairs

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A - Lodge believed Article 10 of the covenant infringed on the United States' power to declare war, if necessary, and expand its territories. Henry Cabot Lodge, a leading Republican Senator and Chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, had a number of reservations about the Treaty of Versailles and the League of Nations, which was integral to the Treaty. Lodge and many of his colleagues were worried about Article 10, which was a commitment to mutual defense among League members. They felt this article would limit America's autonomy in foreign policy and its ability to make independent decisions regarding war. Lodge did not want to commit the United States to international obligations that might require military intervention without the explicit consent of Congress. His reluctance to ratify the Treaty as it was led to the ultimate failure of the United States to join the League of Nations.

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